the-gas-station:

A Retrospective Exploration of Sanzhi Pod City | Hey-Gem | Via

Some called them the ‘UFO houses’ or ‘ruins of the future’ on account of their bizarre appearance. And there’s little doubt that the abandoned buildings making up Sanzhi Pod City constituted one of the world’s strangest modern ghost towns before they were torn down in late 2008. This series of images takes us on a retrospective wander through the ruins, which became an offbeat tourist attraction and remain the subject of online discussions and articles.

Resembling Futuro houses, the unique structures in New Taipei City were built in 1978 as a holiday resort aimed at US military personnel serving in East Asia. But the project failed to take off and was abandoned two years later amid rumours of unfortunate accidents that cast a bleak shadow over the development.

Local folklore holds that the site had been a burial ground for Dutch soldiers, who had somehow been disturbed by the construction work. Others suggest that the widening of a nearby road had interfered with the sculpture of a Chinese dragon, bringing ill-fortune to the so-called UFO houses. Whatever the truth behind the myth, a series of financial failings appear to be real reason for Sanzhi’s demise.

(Source: ryanpanos)

1,180 notes

If you were curious about where I’ve been lately, I’ve been working on a thing https://www.facebook.com/BeYourOwnHero2014

1 note

alidouglass:

Cover for the January issue of Skirt! Magazine in Charleston.

alidouglass:

Cover for the January issue of Skirt! Magazine in Charleston.

3,765 notes

diaryof-alittleswitch:

I love Sheldon. This gif set always makes me smile

(Source: seanmorrisons)

11,560 notes

headbangingdisaster:

banana-soul:

This is me, my name is Kelli and I’m 17-years-old, battling cancer for the third time. I have less than a year to live and the only thing I want to do more than anything before I die is meet Ellen. She’s my sunshine. She’s the reason I wake up everyday and I watch her show every morning. She just radiates so much joy and happiness and she gives me hope. It’s really my dream to be able to meet her. Unfortunately, due to a long waiting list, the Wish Foundation told me I probably wouldn’t be able to meet her within my short timeline. But I see miracles happen all the time.. therefore I won’t give up on my dream. I thought that maybe if this gets enough attention, someone from the Ellen Show would come across it, or maybe even Ellen herself will know of me and my wish to meet her. Please, help me make my wish come true.  

HELP HER

headbangingdisaster:

banana-soul:

This is me, my name is Kelli and I’m 17-years-old, battling cancer for the third time. I have less than a year to live and the only thing I want to do more than anything before I die is meet Ellen. She’s my sunshine. She’s the reason I wake up everyday and I watch her show every morning. She just radiates so much joy and happiness and she gives me hope. It’s really my dream to be able to meet her. Unfortunately, due to a long waiting list, the Wish Foundation told me I probably wouldn’t be able to meet her within my short timeline. But I see miracles happen all the time.. therefore I won’t give up on my dream. I thought that maybe if this gets enough attention, someone from the Ellen Show would come across it, or maybe even Ellen herself will know of me and my wish to meet her. Please, help me make my wish come true.  

HELP HER

322,850 notes

agna-livelovelaugh:

escapekit:

 Chromatic Typewriter Prints

Tyree Callahan has recycled (or upcycled, perhaps) a classic 1937 Underwood typewriter by replacing letters with sponges soaked across the spectrum with bright yellows, reds, blues and combinations thereof.

oh god

454,130 notes

mapsontheweb:

Seattle’s rail & streetcar systems , by Oran Viriyincy
SounderBruce:


Source: "Puget Sound Rail 2023" by Oran Viriyincy (on Flickr)
For comparison, this is what the light rail system looks like today.

mapsontheweb:

Seattle’s rail & streetcar systems , by Oran Viriyincy

SounderBruce:

48 notes

square-pegs-in-round-holes:

moleculess:

Unit Circle Banana Cream Pie (by hmw0029)

Shall make this

square-pegs-in-round-holes:

moleculess:

Unit Circle Banana Cream Pie (by hmw0029)

Shall make this

887 notes

nightfalltwen:

Roseanne had the BEST life lessons.

(Source: stoswald)

513,245 notes

My Holiday. <3<3<3

My Holiday. <3<3<3

2 notes

whiteysplace asked: *points at you* I remember you. Hi! :-)

Hello there!! Thanks for the awesome posts! ^_^

witch-boots:

shortformblog:

oswaldofguadalupe:

The Twitter Mandela Hall Of Shame

When the right side of history doesn’t forget.

daaaamn they did it

57,621 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its historyDecember 5, 2013
It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.
"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 
She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 
It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.
"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."
In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 
The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.
"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “
There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.
"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Iceland grieves after police kill a man for the first time in its history
December 5, 2013

It was an unprecedented headline in Iceland this week — a man shot to death by police.

"The nation was in shock. This does not happen in our country," said Thora Arnorsdottir, news editor at RUV, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service. 

She was referring to a 59-year old man who was shot by police on Monday. The man, who started shooting at police when they entered his building, had a history of mental illness. 

It’s the first time someone has been killed by armed police in Iceland since it became an independent republic in 1944. Police don’t even carry weapons, usually. Violent crime in Iceland is almost non-existent.

"The nation does not want its police force to carry weapons because it’s dangerous, it’s threatening," Arnorsdottir says. "It’s a part of the culture. Guns are used to go hunting as a sport, but you never see a gun."

In fact, Iceland isn’t anti-gun. In terms of per-capita gun ownership, Iceland ranks 15th in the world. Still, this incident was so rare that neighbors of the man shot were comparing the shooting to a scene from an American film. 

The Icelandic police department said officers involved will go through grief counseling. And the police department has already apologized to the family of the man who died — though not necessarily because they did anything wrong.

"I think it’s respectful," Arnorsdottir says, “because no one wants to take another person’s life. “

There are still a number of questions to be answered, including why police didn’t first try to negotiate with man before entering his building.

"A part of the great thing of living in this country is that you can enter parliament and the only thing they ask you to do is to turn off your cellphone, so you don’t disturb the parliamentarians while they’re talking. We do not have armed guards following our prime minister or president. That’s a part of the great thing of living in a peaceful society. We do not want to change that. " 

Source

59,026 notes